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Itinerary: 2021 Thorne

THORNE 2 pax / 2021 East Africa Safari

Itinerary Details
GARY & DIANE THORNE SAFARI

 $9,865 / per person sharing /2 pax min.( pending 2021 cost updates)

CLICK  FOR THORNE DATED 2021 DETAILED  ITINERARY

CLICK FOR THORNE STATEMENT & PAYMENT INFO

HIGHLIGHTS
  • Uganda Gorilla safari
  • Serengeti safari - Tanzania
  • Tarangire safari- Tanzania
  • Zanzibar
Departure & Return Location

Entebbe Airport(Google Map)

Zanzibar Airport(Google Map)

 

Price Includes
  • Accommodation & Meals as specified
  • "Inter-Africa" flight as per itinerary
  • Tour Guide (where applicable)
  • All transportation as specified on itinerary
  • Activities as specified in itinerary
Price Excludes
  • International airfare
  • Tips & Private Expenses
  • Visa's (When applicable)
  • Additional accommodation before or after the safari
  • Park and enhance fees as indicated
Map


 VISA & Levy’s

  • Zimbabwe: Foreigners need to obtain a visa at the port of entry.Cost os US $ 50 per person and should be paid in cash.
  • No other visa’s are required for USA citizens entering into South Africa, Namibia or Botswana
  • Please refer to https://travel.state.gov/content/travel.html for updated information on each country

VACCINATIONS

Please refer to your health care professional for advise , as well as the CDC for updated information, but typically only malaria prevention medication is advised. Usually, no  other shots are required

*NOTES

  1. Cost may vary depending on actual booking dates and currency fluctuations. Airline tickets have been estimated and can vary depending on booking dates, fares and available flights
  2. BOARDING: Full Boarding (Dinner, Bed & Breakfast) / B&B (Bed & Breakfast). Drinks might or might not be included depending in the specific location – please inquire if you need details
  3. Child policy may apply & single occupancy policy apply
  4. Park entry fees and cable car ride fees are not included
  5. Checking passport validity and sufficient empty pages needed in the passport remains the client’s responsibility
  6. Checking and obtaining the necessary/applicable VISA’s for each country visited is the client’s responsibility

They say that all bugs in Africa bite…but the Safari Bug is the worst of them all!

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UGANDA

Land of the Gorillas!

Uganda, better known as the “Pearl of Africa”, is a country filled with national parks and game reserves with enticing promises of wildlife sightings.

Explore Uganda's stunning greenery, soaring mountains, and the greatest natural treasure of all - half of the world's remaining mountain gorilla population.Read more about Uganda

Entebbe Guesthouse

1 Night

The Guest House is a charming property situated in tropical gardens on the outskirts of Entebbe, just 5 minutes from Entebbe International Airport. A tastefully restored colonial homestead consisting of comfortable bedrooms. Each of them is decorated along African themes and has their own private bathroom. A diners’ bar is set in a landscaped garden with lake views. The main house includes a private dining veranda and living room for overnight guests.

BWINDI IMPENETRABLE FOREST

Gorillas in Bwindi!

The Bwindi Impenetrable National Park is a biodiverse, mountainous area in southwest Uganda. An ancient rain forest, the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest extends over a series of steep ridges in the Virunga Volcanoes mountain range. Declared a UNESCO world heritage site due to its ecological uniqueness and natural beauty, roughly half of the world’s total gorilla population live in this park.

The Mountain Gorillas are among Uganda’s top tourist attraction. While trekking these great creatures, the experience and excitement you encounter while with them is really worthwhile. Tracking mountain gorillas in Bwindi Forest can be conducted all year round. Some gorilla trekkers prefer visiting from June to September as well as from December up to February. You can visit Bwindi at any time of the year, the low season calls for cheaper gorilla permit price but generally there is slight difference in the seasons.

ACTIVITIES
Meet the gorillas eye to eye in the wild and spend a full hour watching, photographing and learning about these great apes that are only found in Uganda!
Encounter these fascinating primates in the heart of the World Heritage Site known as the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest. Explore mist-covered mountain slopes in search of enchanted moments spend watching the intricate interaction of families of mountain gorilla.
Track the groups of mountain gorilla that live protected by this dense network of vines and shrubs, rewarded by exhilarating moments as you get to view their complex social structure at work.

Gorilla trekking is a unique, thrilling and fulfilling experience – it is a journey leading one to appreciate the hidden treasures of Uganda. There are over 36 gorilla groups within Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park but only eleven can be visited for gorilla tracking since others are still undergoing habituation process. Visiting one or more habituated gorilla groups in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park is worth as each of them tells different stories which afterwards rewards visitors with unforgettable experiences of a life time. The habituated gorillas are now used to humans but they are wild. So anything unexpected can happen-follow the guides rules you will get no harm normally you do not eat or drink when you’re with the gorillas. You should keep a distance of 7m from the gorillas, although of course the gorillas themselves are unaware of this and will often get very close, in which case you should try to move away.

Bwindi Impenetrable Forest Lodge Accommodation

Gorilla trekking experience!

Set on the banks of the pristine Munyanga River and facing the Impenetrable Forest! A huge terrace wraps around the main building, from where guests can enjoy views of the forest and relax to the sound of the river flowing gently by. Sink into a chair in front of the fireplace in the living room with a book, or enjoy a drink from the bar before sitting down to dinner in the restaurant or out on the terrace. Most of the produce used is grown on-site to ensure everything is as fresh as it is delicious.

BWINDI IMPENETRABLE FOREST

Gorillas in Bwindi!

The Bwindi Impenetrable National Park is a biodiverse, mountainous area in southwest Uganda. An ancient rain forest, the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest extends over a series of steep ridges in the Virunga Volcanoes mountain range. Declared a UNESCO world heritage site due to its ecological uniqueness and natural beauty, roughly half of the world’s total gorilla population live in this park.

The Mountain Gorillas are among Uganda’s top tourist attraction. While trekking these great creatures, the experience and excitement you encounter while with them is really worthwhile. Tracking mountain gorillas in Bwindi Forest can be conducted all year round. Some gorilla trekkers prefer visiting from June to September as well as from December up to February. You can visit Bwindi at any time of the year, the low season calls for cheaper gorilla permit price but generally there is slight difference in the seasons.

ACTIVITIES
Meet the gorillas eye to eye in the wild and spend a full hour watching, photographing and learning about these great apes that are only found in Uganda!
Encounter these fascinating primates in the heart of the World Heritage Site known as the Bwindi Impenetrable Forest. Explore mist-covered mountain slopes in search of enchanted moments spend watching the intricate interaction of families of mountain gorilla.
Track the groups of mountain gorilla that live protected by this dense network of vines and shrubs, rewarded by exhilarating moments as you get to view their complex social structure at work.

Gorilla trekking is a unique, thrilling and fulfilling experience – it is a journey leading one to appreciate the hidden treasures of Uganda. There are over 36 gorilla groups within Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park but only eleven can be visited for gorilla tracking since others are still undergoing habituation process. Visiting one or more habituated gorilla groups in Bwindi Impenetrable Forest National Park is worth as each of them tells different stories which afterwards rewards visitors with unforgettable experiences of a life time. The habituated gorillas are now used to humans but they are wild. So anything unexpected can happen-follow the guides rules you will get no harm normally you do not eat or drink when you’re with the gorillas. You should keep a distance of 7m from the gorillas, although of course the gorillas themselves are unaware of this and will often get very close, in which case you should try to move away.

Bwindi Impenetrable Forest Lodge Accommodation

Gorilla trekking experience!

Set on the banks of the pristine Munyanga River and facing the Impenetrable Forest! A huge terrace wraps around the main building, from where guests can enjoy views of the forest and relax to the sound of the river flowing gently by. Sink into a chair in front of the fireplace in the living room with a book, or enjoy a drink from the bar before sitting down to dinner in the restaurant or out on the terrace. Most of the produce used is grown on-site to ensure everything is as fresh as it is delicious.

SERNEGETI NATIONAL PARK

Safari in the iconic Serengeti!

Serengeti National Park is located in Northern Tanzania and covers an area of about 14.670 km². The park was founded in 1920 and became a National Park in 1951. The Park is especially famous for its’ immense Wildebeest and Zebra herds, but it is not without reason that it is also known as the best place for observation wildlife in general.

The Serengeti is one of the ten natural travel wonders of the world. The Serengeti migration is as remarkable as it is impressive. This migration takes place twice a year within Kenya and Tanzania and is considered one of the greatest migrations of wildlife on the planet. Its ecosystem is spread across 60,000 square kilometers and is home to the largest diverse concentration of wildlife and famous for infamous for the migration of nearly two million Wildebeests, Zebras, and Antelopes.

The Great Migration is as old as human history. Fossils that were found in the Olduvai canyon, prove that Wildebeests have already been using the planes of the Serengeti for their migration over a million years ago. Already to those times, they were following the rains through the Serengeti.

The yearly cycle begins in the south of the park, where half a million calves are born between January and March. But when the rains end in May the land dries fast and the grazing animals must move on, heading for their dry season refuge in the Masai Mara. The key players in this 1,200-mile odyssey are the wildebeest – 1.5 million of them – accompanied by 200,000 zebras, 350,000 Thompson's' impala and Grant's gazelles. For them, every year is an endless journey, chasing the rains in a race for life.

The action takes place across 150,000 square miles of woodlands, hills and open plains, a wilderness that includes not only the Serengeti national park and Kenya’s Masai Mara game reserve but also the dispersal areas beyond. With the beginning of the short rains in late October the migration makes its way back into the Serengeti, so this a good time to be anywhere in the north of the park. By December, having emerged from the northern woodlands, the herds return past Seronera to mass on their calving grounds again and the circle is complete. But as soon as the rains return the wildebeest head back to the Serengeti, drawn towards their calving grounds in the park’s deep south. Between January and March, when the calves are born, there is nowhere on Earth so vibrantly alive.

When the rains end in May the wildebeest make tracks for the Masai Mara. Some take Route One – north across the Seronera Valley. Others swing through the Western Corridor, but for all of them the journey is beset with danger. For a start there are the famous Serengeti lions – about 3,000 at the last count – to which can be added leopards and cheetahs, hungry hyena clans and monster crocodiles. The river crossing is most likely one on the most dramatic events in the Serengeti!
The exact dates of the actual river crossing is always a mystery but it is usually around the end of July through mid-Augus.t

THE CENTRAL SERENGETI
This area is the vibrant, beating heart of the Serengeti. The Central Serengeti sees high volumes of visitors due to the large amounts of resident wildlife. This gives travelers a high chance of seeing wildlife in the least amount of time. The central Serengeti is the quintessential image of a Serengeti safari; stretches of savanna grassland dotted with acacia and baobab trees. The Seronera River Valley is beautiful and the year-round water supply keeps the area rich in predator and prey. The Central Serengeti is a year-round destination thanks to the resident wildlife and reaches its peak in the dry season from June to November.

WESTERN CORRIDOR & GRUMETI
The Western Corridor is a remote section of the Serengeti which stretches to Lake Victoria. This area is well known for the Grumeti River which is the scene of treacherous river crossings that form part of the Great Migration. Thousands of wildebeest, zebra and gazelle make their way across the crocodile infested waters en route to the lush plains of the Masai Mara in Kenya. The best time to witness these crossings is from late May to mid-July.

NORTHERN SERENGETI
The Northern Serengeti is a quiet area of the Serengeti thanks to its remote and secluded location. Expect far fewer crowds here as it requires long travel times to get to the northern area. The trip is worth it as the Northern Serengeti’s landscapes are varied and beautiful and it is home to exciting wildlife. It is also where travelers can watch the dramatic Mara River crossings. Herds that are thousands strong make the dangerous crossing, attempting to avoid the crocodiles as they do so. The best time to visit with a high chance of seeing the river crossings is from July to September.

SOUTHERN SERENGETI
Serengeti translates loosely to “endless plains” in the local Masai language. It could be argued that the seemingly never ending, short grass plains of the Southern Serengeti were the inspiration for the name. This seasonal safari destination is the most accessible area of the Serengeti and stretches from the Central Serengeti and the Seronera to the Ngorongoro Conservation Area. The Lake Ndutu region is dotted with alkaline lakes home to flocks of pink flamingos. This area is great for game viewing during the Great Migration from December to March. Most excitingly, the lush plains are the perfect destination and backdrop for the calving season during February when about half a million calves are born over a 2-3-week period and join the ranks of the huge herds.

EASTERN SERENGETI
The Eastern Serengeti is definitely ‘off the beaten path’ and is one of the most starkly beautiful sections of the Serengeti. Made up of grass plains, rivers and rocky outcrops, this area does not see many tourists but is an exciting safari destination. It is home to all three species of big cat (leopard, lion and cheetah) with a noticeably high concentration of cheetah. The wildlife viewing in the eastern Serengeti is at its best during the dry season and reaches its pinnacle in November when the Great Migration passes through.

Serengeti Mobile Camp

Serengeti safari days!

The camp is designed to be lightweight enough to move seasonally, is located in the Ndutu area from December through March. The camp relocates to Western Serengeti from May through June, and again to Northern Serengeti from July through November. Operates off-the-grid and relies on a custom built solar system for its power.

The perfect place to return to after an exhilarating day of game drives, the camp blends an authentic bush experience with delicious food and a comfortable atmosphere. Relax on your tent's verandah and learn to expect the unexpected as you watch life in the Serengeti unfold.

Accommodation includes 5 double en-suite tents,3 family en-suite tents accommodating up to 2 adults and 2 children and a private, shaded verandah overlooking the Serengeti ecosystem. Room fabrics are African designs, and the camp's furniture was commissioned and crafted by artisans in Arusha, Tanzania.

Accommodation includes 5 double en-suite tents,3 family en-suite tents accommodating up to 2 adults and 2 children and a private, shaded verandah overlooking the Serengeti ecosystem. Room fabrics are African designs, and the camp's furniture was commissioned and crafted by artisans in Arusha, Tanzania.

From December through March, the wildebeest migration moves in and out of the Ndutu area. Ndutu is located in Ngorongoro Conservation Area, just south of Serengeti National Park. The camp’s location provides easy access to prime game viewing areas around Lakes Ndutu and Masek. In addition to the almost two million wildebeest and zebra that move through the area each year, Ndutu is home to cheetah, lion, giraffe and hundreds of bird species. During February’s calving season, the wildebeest give birth to 8,000 babies a day.

From May through June, the camp relocates to Western Serengeti. The wildebeest migration is generally in this area during this time, and crossings over the Grumeti River are sometimes seen in this area. Access to Central Serengeti is also possible from this area as the drive is only 2 hours.

From July through November, the camp is located in Northern Serengeti. The camp is close to the Mara River, allowing easy access to several river crossing points in the area. During this time of year, the wildebeest migration is crossing the Mara River back and forth from Tanzania to Kenya. River crossings are common with crocodiles, hippos and large cats scattered throughout the area

ACTIVITIES
Full day game drives along the Mara river and surrounding the large migration!

SERNEGETI NATIONAL PARK

Safari in the iconic Serengeti!

Serengeti National Park is located in Northern Tanzania and covers an area of about 14.670 km². The park was founded in 1920 and became a National Park in 1951. The Park is especially famous for its’ immense Wildebeest and Zebra herds, but it is not without reason that it is also known as the best place for observation wildlife in general.

The Serengeti is one of the ten natural travel wonders of the world. The Serengeti migration is as remarkable as it is impressive. This migration takes place twice a year within Kenya and Tanzania and is considered one of the greatest migrations of wildlife on the planet. Its ecosystem is spread across 60,000 square kilometers and is home to the largest diverse concentration of wildlife and famous for infamous for the migration of nearly two million Wildebeests, Zebras, and Antelopes.

The Great Migration is as old as human history. Fossils that were found in the Olduvai canyon, prove that Wildebeests have already been using the planes of the Serengeti for their migration over a million years ago. Already to those times, they were following the rains through the Serengeti.

The yearly cycle begins in the south of the park, where half a million calves are born between January and March. But when the rains end in May the land dries fast and the grazing animals must move on, heading for their dry season refuge in the Masai Mara. The key players in this 1,200-mile odyssey are the wildebeest – 1.5 million of them – accompanied by 200,000 zebras, 350,000 Thompson's' impala and Grant's gazelles. For them, every year is an endless journey, chasing the rains in a race for life.

The action takes place across 150,000 square miles of woodlands, hills and open plains, a wilderness that includes not only the Serengeti national park and Kenya’s Masai Mara game reserve but also the dispersal areas beyond. With the beginning of the short rains in late October the migration makes its way back into the Serengeti, so this a good time to be anywhere in the north of the park. By December, having emerged from the northern woodlands, the herds return past Seronera to mass on their calving grounds again and the circle is complete. But as soon as the rains return the wildebeest head back to the Serengeti, drawn towards their calving grounds in the park’s deep south. Between January and March, when the calves are born, there is nowhere on Earth so vibrantly alive.

When the rains end in May the wildebeest make tracks for the Masai Mara. Some take Route One – north across the Seronera Valley. Others swing through the Western Corridor, but for all of them the journey is beset with danger. For a start there are the famous Serengeti lions – about 3,000 at the last count – to which can be added leopards and cheetahs, hungry hyena clans and monster crocodiles. The river crossing is most likely one on the most dramatic events in the Serengeti!
The exact dates of the actual river crossing is always a mystery but it is usually around the end of July through mid-Augus.t

THE CENTRAL SERENGETI
This area is the vibrant, beating heart of the Serengeti. The Central Serengeti sees high volumes of visitors due to the large amounts of resident wildlife. This gives travelers a high chance of seeing wildlife in the least amount of time. The central Serengeti is the quintessential image of a Serengeti safari; stretches of savanna grassland dotted with acacia and baobab trees. The Seronera River Valley is beautiful and the year-round water supply keeps the area rich in predator and prey. The Central Serengeti is a year-round destination thanks to the resident wildlife and reaches its peak in the dry season from June to November.

WESTERN CORRIDOR & GRUMETI
The Western Corridor is a remote section of the Serengeti which stretches to Lake Victoria. This area is well known for the Grumeti River which is the scene of treacherous river crossings that form part of the Great Migration. Thousands of wildebeest, zebra and gazelle make their way across the crocodile infested waters en route to the lush plains of the Masai Mara in Kenya. The best time to witness these crossings is from late May to mid-July.

NORTHERN SERENGETI
The Northern Serengeti is a quiet area of the Serengeti thanks to its remote and secluded location. Expect far fewer crowds here as it requires long travel times to get to the northern area. The trip is worth it as the Northern Serengeti’s landscapes are varied and beautiful and it is home to exciting wildlife. It is also where travelers can watch the dramatic Mara River crossings. Herds that are thousands strong make the dangerous crossing, attempting to avoid the crocodiles as they do so. The best time to visit with a high chance of seeing the river crossings is from July to September.

SOUTHERN SERENGETI
Serengeti translates loosely to “endless plains” in the local Masai language. It could be argued that the seemingly never ending, short grass plains of the Southern Serengeti were the inspiration for the name. This seasonal safari destination is the most accessible area of the Serengeti and stretches from the Central Serengeti and the Seronera to the Ngorongoro Conservation Area. The Lake Ndutu region is dotted with alkaline lakes home to flocks of pink flamingos. This area is great for game viewing during the Great Migration from December to March. Most excitingly, the lush plains are the perfect destination and backdrop for the calving season during February when about half a million calves are born over a 2-3-week period and join the ranks of the huge herds.

EASTERN SERENGETI
The Eastern Serengeti is definitely ‘off the beaten path’ and is one of the most starkly beautiful sections of the Serengeti. Made up of grass plains, rivers and rocky outcrops, this area does not see many tourists but is an exciting safari destination. It is home to all three species of big cat (leopard, lion and cheetah) with a noticeably high concentration of cheetah. The wildlife viewing in the eastern Serengeti is at its best during the dry season and reaches its pinnacle in November when the Great Migration passes through.

Serengeti Mobile Camp

Serengeti safari days!

The camp is designed to be lightweight enough to move seasonally, is located in the Ndutu area from December through March. The camp relocates to Western Serengeti from May through June, and again to Northern Serengeti from July through November. Operates off-the-grid and relies on a custom built solar system for its power.

The perfect place to return to after an exhilarating day of game drives, the camp blends an authentic bush experience with delicious food and a comfortable atmosphere. Relax on your tent's verandah and learn to expect the unexpected as you watch life in the Serengeti unfold.

Accommodation includes 5 double en-suite tents,3 family en-suite tents accommodating up to 2 adults and 2 children and a private, shaded verandah overlooking the Serengeti ecosystem. Room fabrics are African designs, and the camp's furniture was commissioned and crafted by artisans in Arusha, Tanzania.

Accommodation includes 5 double en-suite tents,3 family en-suite tents accommodating up to 2 adults and 2 children and a private, shaded verandah overlooking the Serengeti ecosystem. Room fabrics are African designs, and the camp's furniture was commissioned and crafted by artisans in Arusha, Tanzania.

From December through March, the wildebeest migration moves in and out of the Ndutu area. Ndutu is located in Ngorongoro Conservation Area, just south of Serengeti National Park. The camp’s location provides easy access to prime game viewing areas around Lakes Ndutu and Masek. In addition to the almost two million wildebeest and zebra that move through the area each year, Ndutu is home to cheetah, lion, giraffe and hundreds of bird species. During February’s calving season, the wildebeest give birth to 8,000 babies a day.

From May through June, the camp relocates to Western Serengeti. The wildebeest migration is generally in this area during this time, and crossings over the Grumeti River are sometimes seen in this area. Access to Central Serengeti is also possible from this area as the drive is only 2 hours.

From July through November, the camp is located in Northern Serengeti. The camp is close to the Mara River, allowing easy access to several river crossing points in the area. During this time of year, the wildebeest migration is crossing the Mara River back and forth from Tanzania to Kenya. River crossings are common with crocodiles, hippos and large cats scattered throughout the area

ACTIVITIES
Full day game drives along the Mara river and surrounding the large migration!

SERNEGETI NATIONAL PARK

Safari in the iconic Serengeti!

Serengeti National Park is located in Northern Tanzania and covers an area of about 14.670 km². The park was founded in 1920 and became a National Park in 1951. The Park is especially famous for its’ immense Wildebeest and Zebra herds, but it is not without reason that it is also known as the best place for observation wildlife in general.

The Serengeti is one of the ten natural travel wonders of the world. The Serengeti migration is as remarkable as it is impressive. This migration takes place twice a year within Kenya and Tanzania and is considered one of the greatest migrations of wildlife on the planet. Its ecosystem is spread across 60,000 square kilometers and is home to the largest diverse concentration of wildlife and famous for infamous for the migration of nearly two million Wildebeests, Zebras, and Antelopes.

The Great Migration is as old as human history. Fossils that were found in the Olduvai canyon, prove that Wildebeests have already been using the planes of the Serengeti for their migration over a million years ago. Already to those times, they were following the rains through the Serengeti.

The yearly cycle begins in the south of the park, where half a million calves are born between January and March. But when the rains end in May the land dries fast and the grazing animals must move on, heading for their dry season refuge in the Masai Mara. The key players in this 1,200-mile odyssey are the wildebeest – 1.5 million of them – accompanied by 200,000 zebras, 350,000 Thompson's' impala and Grant's gazelles. For them, every year is an endless journey, chasing the rains in a race for life.

The action takes place across 150,000 square miles of woodlands, hills and open plains, a wilderness that includes not only the Serengeti national park and Kenya’s Masai Mara game reserve but also the dispersal areas beyond. With the beginning of the short rains in late October the migration makes its way back into the Serengeti, so this a good time to be anywhere in the north of the park. By December, having emerged from the northern woodlands, the herds return past Seronera to mass on their calving grounds again and the circle is complete. But as soon as the rains return the wildebeest head back to the Serengeti, drawn towards their calving grounds in the park’s deep south. Between January and March, when the calves are born, there is nowhere on Earth so vibrantly alive.

When the rains end in May the wildebeest make tracks for the Masai Mara. Some take Route One – north across the Seronera Valley. Others swing through the Western Corridor, but for all of them the journey is beset with danger. For a start there are the famous Serengeti lions – about 3,000 at the last count – to which can be added leopards and cheetahs, hungry hyena clans and monster crocodiles. The river crossing is most likely one on the most dramatic events in the Serengeti!
The exact dates of the actual river crossing is always a mystery but it is usually around the end of July through mid-Augus.t

THE CENTRAL SERENGETI
This area is the vibrant, beating heart of the Serengeti. The Central Serengeti sees high volumes of visitors due to the large amounts of resident wildlife. This gives travelers a high chance of seeing wildlife in the least amount of time. The central Serengeti is the quintessential image of a Serengeti safari; stretches of savanna grassland dotted with acacia and baobab trees. The Seronera River Valley is beautiful and the year-round water supply keeps the area rich in predator and prey. The Central Serengeti is a year-round destination thanks to the resident wildlife and reaches its peak in the dry season from June to November.

WESTERN CORRIDOR & GRUMETI
The Western Corridor is a remote section of the Serengeti which stretches to Lake Victoria. This area is well known for the Grumeti River which is the scene of treacherous river crossings that form part of the Great Migration. Thousands of wildebeest, zebra and gazelle make their way across the crocodile infested waters en route to the lush plains of the Masai Mara in Kenya. The best time to witness these crossings is from late May to mid-July.

NORTHERN SERENGETI
The Northern Serengeti is a quiet area of the Serengeti thanks to its remote and secluded location. Expect far fewer crowds here as it requires long travel times to get to the northern area. The trip is worth it as the Northern Serengeti’s landscapes are varied and beautiful and it is home to exciting wildlife. It is also where travelers can watch the dramatic Mara River crossings. Herds that are thousands strong make the dangerous crossing, attempting to avoid the crocodiles as they do so. The best time to visit with a high chance of seeing the river crossings is from July to September.

SOUTHERN SERENGETI
Serengeti translates loosely to “endless plains” in the local Masai language. It could be argued that the seemingly never ending, short grass plains of the Southern Serengeti were the inspiration for the name. This seasonal safari destination is the most accessible area of the Serengeti and stretches from the Central Serengeti and the Seronera to the Ngorongoro Conservation Area. The Lake Ndutu region is dotted with alkaline lakes home to flocks of pink flamingos. This area is great for game viewing during the Great Migration from December to March. Most excitingly, the lush plains are the perfect destination and backdrop for the calving season during February when about half a million calves are born over a 2-3-week period and join the ranks of the huge herds.

EASTERN SERENGETI
The Eastern Serengeti is definitely ‘off the beaten path’ and is one of the most starkly beautiful sections of the Serengeti. Made up of grass plains, rivers and rocky outcrops, this area does not see many tourists but is an exciting safari destination. It is home to all three species of big cat (leopard, lion and cheetah) with a noticeably high concentration of cheetah. The wildlife viewing in the eastern Serengeti is at its best during the dry season and reaches its pinnacle in November when the Great Migration passes through.

Central Serengeti Tented Camp

Serengeti safaris days!

An authentic intimate tented camp set in a secluded part of the game-rich Seronera Valley in Central Serengeti. The Seronera region is an important wildlife transition zone between the southern grasslands and the northern woodlands and is renowned for its year-round game viewing due to its abundance of water in the many rivers, as well as for its large populations of resident big cats. Additionally, between April and June, and again between November and January, this area is crossed by the annual wildebeest migration, which provides always thrilling wildlife drama.

The camp is carefully positioned right at the end of a blind valley, so other vehicles will not interrupt your view across the plains during the day, and in the evening, you can enjoy uninterrupted sunsets with no electric lights in sight.

12 en-suite tents are spacious and comfortable, and have an outside deck offering beautiful views over the area. Each tent is fitted with two queen-size beds with warm duvets, a flush toilet, large safari-style shower, plentiful running water, wooden storage cabinets and flooring, 24-hour solar lighting and outside loungers from which to enjoy early morning teas and coffees and refreshing afternoon gin and tonics.

The mess tent with its separate bar, sitting and dining areas is beautifully decorated with leather sofas, side cabinets, rugs and chests. In the evening, guests can gather inside under the chandeliers or outside around the campfire under starlit skies for sunset cocktails and to share their safari stories.

ACTIVITIES
Game drives in the Serengeti!

TARANGIRE NATIONAL PARK

Safari in the Tarangire!

The Tarangire National Park is located between the meadows of Masai Steppe to the south east and the lakes of the Great Rift Valley to the north and west. Among the rolling area where the park lies, it occupies an area of 2,600 square kilometers. The perennial Tarangire River takes over the northern part of Tarangire. Through the cut ditches, the River flows upwards up to when it leaves the corner of the park, in the North West flowing into Lake Burungi. There are a number of wide swamps which dry into green plains during the dry season in the south.

Thanks to its proximity to Serengeti National Park and Ngorongoro Crater, Tarangire National Park is usually assigned only a day visit as part of a larger northern-circuit itinerary. Yet it deserves much more, at least in the dry season (July to October). It's a place where elephants dot the plains like cattle, and where lion roars and zebra barks fill the night.
But here the wildlife tells only half the story. Dominating the park's 2850 sq km, Tarangire's great stands of epic baobabs should be reason enough to visit. There are also sun-blistered termite mounds in abundance, as well as grassy savannah plains and vast swamps. And cleaving the park in two is the Tarangire River, its meandering course and (in some places) steep banks providing a dry-season lure for animals and thus many stirring wildlife encounters for visitors.

Tarangire Park Camp

Big game safari days!

Set in light acacia woodland in the south of the reserve, the Camp is a mobile tented facility which offers an authentic safari experience. Tarangire is a substantial national park which offers a subtle experience, but there are plenty of things to see, notably the wonderful baobab trees and a prodigious elephant during the June to November dry season.

The camp is centered on a pair of open-sided mess tents with lounge and dining areas, leading out to a camp-fire. Guest accommodation is in nine large guest tents with private indoor bathrooms. The tents are well-spaced and roomy; the meals are good; and the manager and staff couldn't make you feel more welcome. Activities focus on daytime safaris (evening safaris are occasional rather than regular), hot-air ballooning (always a real eye-opener), walking safaris and game viewing from each tent's private veranda.

ACTIVITIES
Activities are focused on daytime vehicle safari, with options for balloon safari, walking safaris and night game drives.

TARANGIRE NATIONAL PARK

Safari in the Tarangire!

The Tarangire National Park is located between the meadows of Masai Steppe to the south east and the lakes of the Great Rift Valley to the north and west. Among the rolling area where the park lies, it occupies an area of 2,600 square kilometers. The perennial Tarangire River takes over the northern part of Tarangire. Through the cut ditches, the River flows upwards up to when it leaves the corner of the park, in the North West flowing into Lake Burungi. There are a number of wide swamps which dry into green plains during the dry season in the south.

Thanks to its proximity to Serengeti National Park and Ngorongoro Crater, Tarangire National Park is usually assigned only a day visit as part of a larger northern-circuit itinerary. Yet it deserves much more, at least in the dry season (July to October). It's a place where elephants dot the plains like cattle, and where lion roars and zebra barks fill the night.
But here the wildlife tells only half the story. Dominating the park's 2850 sq km, Tarangire's great stands of epic baobabs should be reason enough to visit. There are also sun-blistered termite mounds in abundance, as well as grassy savannah plains and vast swamps. And cleaving the park in two is the Tarangire River, its meandering course and (in some places) steep banks providing a dry-season lure for animals and thus many stirring wildlife encounters for visitors.

Tarangire Park Camp

Big game safari days!

Set in light acacia woodland in the south of the reserve, the Camp is a mobile tented facility which offers an authentic safari experience. Tarangire is a substantial national park which offers a subtle experience, but there are plenty of things to see, notably the wonderful baobab trees and a prodigious elephant during the June to November dry season.

The camp is centered on a pair of open-sided mess tents with lounge and dining areas, leading out to a camp-fire. Guest accommodation is in nine large guest tents with private indoor bathrooms. The tents are well-spaced and roomy; the meals are good; and the manager and staff couldn't make you feel more welcome. Activities focus on daytime safaris (evening safaris are occasional rather than regular), hot-air ballooning (always a real eye-opener), walking safaris and game viewing from each tent's private veranda.

ACTIVITIES
Activities are focused on daytime vehicle safari, with options for balloon safari, walking safaris and night game drives.

Zanzibar

Experience the Spice Island!

Zanzibar is a semi-autonomous region of Tanzania. It is composed of the Zanzibar Archipelago in the Indian Ocean (16–31 miles) off the coast of the mainland, and consists of many small islands and two large ones: Unguja and Pemba Island. The capital is Zanzibar City, located on the island of Unguja. Its historic center is Stone Town, which is a World Heritage Site. < /p>

Zanzibar's main industries are spices, raffia, and tourism. In particular, the islands produce cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon, and black pepper. For this reason, the Zanzibar Archipelago, together with Tanzania's Mafia Island, are sometimes referred to locally as the "Spice Islands". < /p>

The name Zanzibar immediately conjures up images of an island paradise with soft-sand, white beaches and shimmering azure waters. But, the Zanzibar Archipelago is so much more than romantic coastlines and blissful sunsets - these islands offer a kaleidoscope of sights, smells and tastes which feed your soul and leave you wanting to return again.

Zanzibar is without a doubt a tropical dream destination, ideal for getting away from it all, but it is also a fascinating destination from a historical and cultural perspective, as well as being a top adventure and eco-tourism destination. < /p>

Stone Town of Zanzibar is a fine example of the Swahili coastal trading towns of East Africa. It retains its urban fabric and townscape virtually intact and contains many fine buildings that reflect its particular culture, which has brought together and homogenized disparate elements of the cultures of Africa, the Arab region, India, and Europe over more than a millennium.

ACTIVITIES
Day tours through the spice routes and historic Stone town!

Zanzibar Eclectic Hotel

2 Nights

Colorful, stylish and with a strong sense of place, this a boutique hotel in the heart of Stone Town. < /p>

It's not just the rooms which benefit from this attention to detail: the public areas – with a twinkling blue fountain set in an interior courtyard – are also well designed. Reminiscent of a Moroccan raid, this courtyard is a cool, palm-filled walled garden, with a swinging seat and a hammock. Large carved wooden doors open into a cool, blue entrance hall and reception, filled with carved furniture and chaises lounges. Towards the back of the house, the Secret Garden is a rustic, open-air courtyard restaurant, a former marketplace now artfully transformed with tables, potted palms and artworks amid the crumbling walls – which is particularly popular at night. A local taarab band (a traditional Swahili orchestra) sometimes plays in the gallery above the garden. < /p>

Up a wooden staircase are the guest rooms, each with its own theme. Finally, up on the roof is the rooftop restaurant, which is in itself a reason to stay here. The five-course tasting menu is delicious – inventive and full of local flavors – as well as being very good value. From the rooftop, you can look west to the Hindu Temple, 200m away.

Zanzibar

Experience the Spice Island!

Zanzibar is a semi-autonomous region of Tanzania. It is composed of the Zanzibar Archipelago in the Indian Ocean (16–31 miles) off the coast of the mainland, and consists of many small islands and two large ones: Unguja and Pemba Island. The capital is Zanzibar City, located on the island of Unguja. Its historic center is Stone Town, which is a World Heritage Site. < /p>

Zanzibar's main industries are spices, raffia, and tourism. In particular, the islands produce cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon, and black pepper. For this reason, the Zanzibar Archipelago, together with Tanzania's Mafia Island, are sometimes referred to locally as the "Spice Islands". < /p>

The name Zanzibar immediately conjures up images of an island paradise with soft-sand, white beaches and shimmering azure waters. But, the Zanzibar Archipelago is so much more than romantic coastlines and blissful sunsets - these islands offer a kaleidoscope of sights, smells and tastes which feed your soul and leave you wanting to return again.

Zanzibar is without a doubt a tropical dream destination, ideal for getting away from it all, but it is also a fascinating destination from a historical and cultural perspective, as well as being a top adventure and eco-tourism destination. < /p>

Stone Town of Zanzibar is a fine example of the Swahili coastal trading towns of East Africa. It retains its urban fabric and townscape virtually intact and contains many fine buildings that reflect its particular culture, which has brought together and homogenized disparate elements of the cultures of Africa, the Arab region, India, and Europe over more than a millennium.

ACTIVITIES
Day tours through the spice routes and historic Stone town!

Pongewe Beach Hotel

Island living!

Nestled between two outcrops of coral rock and on a secluded stretch of white-powdery beach. The star of the show at Pongwe is unquestionably the beach - prettiest on the entire island! Like all the lodges of the East Coast, the beach here at Pongwe is affected significantly by the tide – the good news is that the lodge boasts a lovely swimming pool stunningly perched on a low cliff overlooking the beach which offers all day relief from the heat.
< /p>

A large makuti-thatched structure houses the sociable bar as well as a lounge area with comfortable baraza seating and the dining area. Talking of dining, the food at Pongwe boasts an enviable reputation, which is a good thing given that there are no other restaurants nearby! < /p>

The 16 Beachfront Rooms lie curved around the little cove and it’s simply a case of walking off your porch directly onto some of the softest, whitest sand you’ll find anywhere on the planet! The rooms themselves are clustered together in little semi-detached bungalows of 2 or 3 rooms that are reached via a short stroll down winding sandy paths from the main lodge. Rooms are spacious and very clean with terrazzo floors, cooling ceiling fans and comfortable mosquito-net covered Zanzibari four poster beds decorated prettily with fresh flower blossoms.

ACTIVITIES
Relax on what is one of the most beautiful beaches that you can find in Zanzibar! Kayaks and paddleboards are freely available for guests to use, and Pongwe can also arrange a number of excursions such as diving and snorkeling to the reefs around Mnemba Island or visits to Jozani Forest in Zanzibar's interior.